Tagged: One Week Later

One Week Later: My Favorite Reads This Week

See What Times Square And Wall Street Looked Like 100 Years Ago: “Software engineer Dan Vanderkam has embedded a collection of historical photos from the New York Public Library into an awesome interactive map of old New York.” Read more…

Pushing Pixels: “Rover scientists knew not to fetishize the raw, unmediated image: they accepted that seeing on Mars could only be digitally mediated seeing, and so they regarded the judicious use of color correction as an indispensable part of producing visual knowledge.” Read more…

A Brief History of the Wristwatch: “On July 9, 1916, The New York Times puzzled over a fashion trend: Europeans were starting to wear bracelets with clocks on them. Time had migrated to the human wrist, and the development required some explaining. ‘Until recently,’ the paper observed, ‘the bracelet watch has been looked upon by Americans as more or less of a joke. Vaudeville artists and moving-picture actors have utilized it as a funmaker, as a “silly ass” fad.’” Read more…

How to Change Minds: Blaise Pascal on the Art of Persuasion: “‘People are generally better persuaded by the reasons which they have themselves discovered than by those which have come into the mind of others.’ […] Pascal frames persuasion not as a factor of control but as something predicated first and foremost on empathy—on empathic insight into the context and concerns that animate the other person’s mind.” Read more…

Google got it wrong. The open-office trend is destroying the workplace.: “Despite its obvious problems, the open-office model has continued to encroach on workers across the country. Now, about 70 percent of U.S. offices have no or low partitions, according to the International Facility Management Association. […] As the new space intended, I’ve formed interesting, unexpected bonds with my cohorts. But my personal performance at work has hit an all-time low.” Read more…

One Week Later: My Favorite Reads This Week

The Race to Save Disappearing Data: “A 2013 study of Supreme Court decisions by Harvard University Law School professors found that so-called link rot is eroding intellectual foundations of legal scholarship: Nearly half of all Supreme Court decisions up to that date and more than 70 percent of law journals from 1999 to 2012 referred to Web pages that no longer existed.” Read more…

Forbidden Data: “The new law makes it a crime to gather data about the condition of the environment across most of the state if you plan to share that data with the state or federal government. The reason? The state wants to conceal the fact that many of its streams are contaminated by E. coli bacteria, strains of which can cause serious health problems, even death. Rather than engaging in an honest public debate about the cause or extent of the problem, Wyoming prefers to pretend the problem doesn’t exist.” Read more…

Ms. Henderson’s Second Grade Class’s Math Test: “4. If Nibbler enjoyed eating Fruit Gushers at a rate of 1 gusher every 30 seconds, and it takes 20 Fruit Gushers for the toxicity level of Blue Dye-22 to reach fatal levels in a gerbil, how many minutes into recess did it take for Nibbler to permanently scar every student in Ms. Henderson’s class?” Read more…

Taxi Medallion Markets Collapse Across America: “Uber’s labor practices are deplorable, and the company uses rhetoric about ‘disrupting inefficient markets’ as cover for some really evil behavior. But the reason the rhetoric rings so true is that municipal taxi licensing is a disaster, and it’s one that was deliberately made and continued for decades thanks to the great wealth the dysfunction brought to a tiny minority, who made so much that they were able to set some of their gains aside to lobby to make things stay the same.” Read more…

Could Airbnb Help Solve The Problem Of Vacant Housing?: “‘We couldn’t find a hotel in the neighborhood, and there weren’t really any downtown,’ says Jason Roberts, founder of Better Block. ‘There was only one. At the same time, we saw a city report saying the population is decreasing and there’s this excess housing stock.’” Read more…

How Facebook Exposes Domestic Violence Survivors: “Lily’s ex might never have been able to find her profile in the first place if Facebook hadn’t asked her to display her ‘authentic name’ in order to reopen her account, which had been suspended in December of last year over her use of a pseudonym.” Read more…