Tagged: Psychology

One Week Later: My Favorite Reads This Week

See What Times Square And Wall Street Looked Like 100 Years Ago: “Software engineer Dan Vanderkam has embedded a collection of historical photos from the New York Public Library into an awesome interactive map of old New York.” Read more…

Pushing Pixels: “Rover scientists knew not to fetishize the raw, unmediated image: they accepted that seeing on Mars could only be digitally mediated seeing, and so they regarded the judicious use of color correction as an indispensable part of producing visual knowledge.” Read more…

A Brief History of the Wristwatch: “On July 9, 1916, The New York Times puzzled over a fashion trend: Europeans were starting to wear bracelets with clocks on them. Time had migrated to the human wrist, and the development required some explaining. ‘Until recently,’ the paper observed, ‘the bracelet watch has been looked upon by Americans as more or less of a joke. Vaudeville artists and moving-picture actors have utilized it as a funmaker, as a “silly ass” fad.’” Read more…

How to Change Minds: Blaise Pascal on the Art of Persuasion: “‘People are generally better persuaded by the reasons which they have themselves discovered than by those which have come into the mind of others.’ […] Pascal frames persuasion not as a factor of control but as something predicated first and foremost on empathy—on empathic insight into the context and concerns that animate the other person’s mind.” Read more…

Google got it wrong. The open-office trend is destroying the workplace.: “Despite its obvious problems, the open-office model has continued to encroach on workers across the country. Now, about 70 percent of U.S. offices have no or low partitions, according to the International Facility Management Association. […] As the new space intended, I’ve formed interesting, unexpected bonds with my cohorts. But my personal performance at work has hit an all-time low.” Read more…

Art, the Camera, and Memory.

Taking Pictures (Caillebotte) by Nicholas Knight
Taking Pictures (Caillebotte) by Nicholas Knight

“But the King said…’The fact is that [writing] will produce forgetfulness in the souls of those who have learned it. They will not need to exercise their memories, being able to rely on what is written, calling things to mind no longer from within themselves by their own unaided powers, but under the stimulus of external marks that are alien to themselves. So it’s not a recipe for memory, but for reminding.'”
-Plato, Phaedrus


I’ve been going to art museums more lately, attending the Hopper retrospective at the Whitney, and more recently, the Magritte retrospective at MoMA. Not having been to many art museums in the last decade, I was surprised to see a behavior familiar from concerts: a seeming greater focus on capturing just the right picture or video than on experiencing the thing being recorded.

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